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Progress in Estimating Active Life Expectancy October 9, 2002 National Center for Health Statistics Hyattsville Maryland

By Department of Health and Human Services

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Book Id: WPLBN0000180856
Format Type: PDF eBook
File Size: 0.2 MB
Reproduction Date: 2005

Title: Progress in Estimating Active Life Expectancy October 9, 2002 National Center for Health Statistics Hyattsville Maryland  
Author: Department of Health and Human Services
Volume:
Language: English
Subject: Health., Medical research, Medical reports
Collections: Medical Library Collection
Historic
Publication Date:
Publisher: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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Health And Human Services, D. O. (n.d.). Progress in Estimating Active Life Expectancy October 9, 2002 National Center for Health Statistics Hyattsville Maryland. Retrieved from http://worldlibrary.net.cn/


Excerpt
Summarizing the lifetime health experiences of a population is a difficult task requiring the application of clear definitions, high quality data and complex methodologies. For many, life expectancy at birth is the gold standard of summary measures. It is based upon good data, it is accepted and understood by many, and it correlates well with other measures of population well-being. However, life expectancy is one dimensional, measuring only length of life, and at a time when quality-of-life has gained more importance the quest for measures that incorporate health status has gained momentum. The development of a summary measure also satisfies a need among decision makers, the media, and perhaps the public at large, to reduce a complex process down to a single number that can be used for public health surveillance and decision-making. The National Center for Health Statistics has a long history of involvement in the development and use of summary measures. For many decades, NCHS has coordinated the federal vital statistics program providing the mortality data used to generate estimates of life expectancy. One of the earliest methods for estimating healthy life expectancy was developed at NCHS by Daniel Sullivan. NCHS also has been a leader in developing and fielding some of the longitudinal health surveys used in research on active life expectancy.

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