Children's Literature Collection


Compiled from scans of original children's books. The World Public Library Children's eBook Collection is a selected list of the most popular children's books, "My First Book Collection." Many of these titles are considered all time classics. We hope you and your family enjoy the collection.

 
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Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

By: Lewis Carroll

Excerpt: Down the Rabbit Hole Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, `and what is the use of a book,' thought Alice `without pictures or conversation?' So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of ma...

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Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

By: Lewis Carroll

Excerpt: All in the golden afternoon Full leisurely we glide; For both our oars, with little skill, By little arms are plied, While little hands make vain pretence Our wanderings to guide. Ah, cruel Three! In such an hour Beneath such dreamy weather, To beg a tale of breath too weak To stir the tiniest feather! Yet what can one poor voice avail Against three tongues together?

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Alice's Adventures Underground

By: Lewis Carroll

Excerpt: Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, and where is the use of a book, thought Alice, without pictures or conversations? So she was considering in her own mind, (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid,) whether the pleasure of making a daisy chain wa...

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All Around the Moon

By: Jules Verne

Excerpt: A few years ago the world was suddenly astounded by hearing of an experiment of a most novel and daring nature, altogether unprecedented in the annals of science. The BALTIMORE GUN CLUB, a society of artillerymen started in America during the great Civil War, had conceived the idea of nothing less than establishing direct communication with the Moon by means of a projectile! President Barbican, the originator of the enterprise, was strongly encouraged in its fea...

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All through the Day the Mother Goose Way

By: Jean Broadhurst

Excerpt: It is with pleasure that the author acknowledges the generous aid given in the preparation of this book. The text has benefitted by the advice and criticism of Miss Emma Dolfinger of the Normal School at Louisville, Kentucky; Miss Annie E. Moore, of Teachers College, New York City; Miss Alice Phelps, of the Horace Mann School, New York City; Miss Mary Morris, Perth Amboy, New Jersey; and Miss Marion Lerrigo, Topeka, Kansas.

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American Authors for Young Folks

By: Amanda B. Harris

Excerpt: LET us suppose, as that charming story-teller, Annie Keary, used to begin, let us sup pose that these young people have never read Washington Irving, or never read him except in school-book exercises. There they may have had a page or two out of Rip Van Winkle; perhaps the ludicrous description of Ichabod Crane, his school and his horse; possibly a mutilated chapter from the Alhambra just enough to give a taste, yet just enough to spoil the subject.

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American Fairy Tales

By: L. Frank Baum

Excerpt: The Box of Robbers. No one intended to leave Martha alone that afternoon, but it happened that everyone was called away, for one reason or another. Mrs. McFarland was attending the weekly card party held by the Women?s Anti Gambling League. Sister Nell?s young man had called quite unexpectedly to take her for a long drive. Papa was at the office, as usual. It was Mary Ann?s day out. As for Emeline, she certainly should have stayed in the house and looked after t...

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American Fairy Tales

By: L. Frank Baum

Excerpt: About American Fairy Tales. Since its publication in September 1900, L. Frank Baum's The Wonderful Wizard of Oz has become America's greatest and best loved homegrown fairytale. The first totally American fantasy for children, it is one of the most-read children's books. It has also engendered a long series of sequels, stage plays and musicals, movies and television shows, biographies of Baum, scholarly studies of the significance of the book and film, advertise...

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An Antarctic Mystery

By: Jules Verne

Excerpt: THE KERGUELEN ISLANDS. No doubt the following narrative will be received: with entire incredulity, but I think it well that the public should be put in possession of the facts narrated in ?An Antarctic Mystery.? The public is free to believe them or not, at its good pleasure. No more appropriate scene for the wonderful and terrible adventures which I am about to relate could be imagined than the Desolation Islands, so called, in 1779, by Captain Cook. I lived th...

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An Australian Rip Van Winkle and Other Pieces

By: William Hay

Excerpt: THE ATHENAEUM. The scene of the story is Hobart, Tasmania; the time between 1830 and 1840?and the plot how Sir William Heans, an English gentleman, transported for a crime against society, finds his captivity insupportable, and makes three attempts to escape, of which the third is successful. But this simple plot is only the stem pushing up painfully into the forbidden light; from it there grow many dark, intricate branches and ashy fruits; the half-blind littl...

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An Indian Boy's Story

Excerpt: I was born in Governor Village, N. Y., in April, 1879, during one of the periodical wanderings of my family, and my first recollection is concerning a house in Toronto, Canada, in which I was living with my father and mother, brother and grandmother. I could not have been much more than three years old at the time. My father was a pure-blooded Indian of the Mohawk tribe of the Six Nations, and our home was in the St. Regis reservation in Franklin County, N. Y., ...

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An Inland Voyage

By: Robert Louis Stevenson

Excerpt: To equip so small a book with a preface is, I am half afraid, to sin against proportion. But a preface is more than an author can resist, for it is the reward of his labors. When the foundation stone is laid, the architect appears with his plans, and struts for an hour before the public eye. So with the writer in his preface: he may have never a word to say, but he must show himself for a moment in the portico, hat in hand, and with an urbane demeanor.

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An Inland Voyage

By: Robert Louis Stevenson

Excerpt: My dear Cigarette, It was enough that you should have shared so liberally in the rains and portages of our voyage; that you should have had so hard a paddle to recover the derelict Arethusa on the flooded Oise; and that you should thenceforth have piloted a mere wreck of mankind to Origin Sainte-Benoite and a supper so eagerly desired. It was perhaps more than enough, as you once somewhat piteously complained, that I should have set down all the strong language ...

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An Inland Voyage

By: Robert Louis Stevenson

Excerpt: To equip so small a book with a preface is, I am half afraid, to sin against proportion. But a preface is more than an author can resist, for it is the reward of his labors. When the foundation stone is laid, the architect appears with his plans, and struts for an hour before the public eye. So with the writer in his preface: he may have never a word to say, but he must show himself for a moment in the portico, hat in hand, and with an urbane demeanor.

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Andersen's Fairy Tales

By: Hans Christian Andersen

Excerpt: THE EMPEROR'S NEW CLOTHES. Many years ago, there was an Emperor, who was so excessively fond of new clothes, that he spent all his money in dress. He did not trouble himself in the least about his soldiers; nor did he care to go either to the theatre or the chase, except for the opportunities then afforded him for displaying his new clothes. He had a different suit for each hour of the day; and as of any other king or emperor, one is accustomed to say, he is sit...

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Andersen's Fairy Tales

By: Hans Christian Andersen

Excerpt: THE EMPEROR'S NEW CLOTHES. Many years ago, there was an Emperor, who was so excessively fond of new clothes, that he spent all his money in dress. He did not trouble himself in the least about his soldiers; nor did he care to go either to the theatre or the chase, except for the opportunities then afforded him for displaying his new clothes. He had a different suit for each hour of the day; and as of any other king or emperor, one is accustomed to say, he is sit...

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Anne's House of Dreams

By: L.M. Montgomery

Chapter 1: In the Garret of Green Gables. THANKS BE, I'm done with geometry, learning or teaching it, said Anne Shirley, a trifle vindictively, as she thumped a somewhat battered volume of Euclid into a big chest of books, banged the lid in triumph, and sat down upon it, looking at Diana Wright across the Green Gables garret, with gray eyes that were like a morning sky. The garret was a shadowy, suggestive, delightful place, as all garrets should be. Through the open win...

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Around the Week

By: Ruby Hart

Excerpt: Here we go 'round the mulberry bush, The mulberry bush, the mulberry bush; Oh, here we go 'round the mulberry bush so early in the morning.

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Around the World in a Berry Wagon

By: W.W. Denslow

Excerpt: The name of the beautiful city is from Detroit, (French for strait) or the harrowing of lakes known as the Detroit River. Detroit is the thirteenth city in order of size in the United States.

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Around the World in Eighty Days

By: Jules Verne

Chapter 1: In Which Phileas Fogg and Passepartout Accept Each Other, the One as Master, the Other as Man Mr. Phileas. Fogg lived, in 1872, at No.7, Saville Row, Burlington Gardens. He was one of the most noticeable members of the Reform Club, though he seemed always to avoid attracting attention. This Phileas Fogg was a puzzling gentleman, about whom little was known, except that he was a polished man of the world. People said that he resembled the poet Byron - at least ...

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